More energy cookies


Disclaimer: the first time I made these, my roommate told me they looked, literally, like poop. They’re delicious, despite their humble appearance.

I’ve started a new job this week and have been revisiting some of my favorite snacks and lunches from college. I remade these energy cookies for a friend who is hiking up Machu Picchu, and remembered that they work just as well for the office as for the trail. For a slightly different flavor, I tweaked this recipe for Fudge Babies. The Fudge Babies are amazing; they’re sweet and chocolate-y enough to serve as a healthy dessert. Adding oats makes them feel like a little more of a snack. All three versions take only a few minutes to throw together and I love being able to grab them throughout a busy week.

Chocolate Energy Cookies 

Store in the refrigerator, or freezer if you would like to keep them longer. 

  • 1/2 c oatmeal
  • 3/4 c walnuts
  • 1 1/2 c dates
  • 1/4 c peanut butter
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 3-4 Tbs cocoa powder
  • salt
  1. Blend oatmeal in a food processor until coarsely ground.
  2. Add the rest of the ingredients and process until they are combined. Add more peanut butter if too crumbly.
  3. Scoop out balls using a tablespoon. Roll between palms. Flatten slightly with a fork.

Mediterranean quinoa bowl

IMG_3872I’m choosing to attribute the glow in the picture above to the magical properties of kale, and not to the crappy quality of my iPhone, nor my inability to take pictures/do anything remotely useful when I’m hungry.

Mediterranean quinoa bowl

  • quinoa
  • garbanzos
  • kale
  • marinated artichokes
  • sun dried tomatoes
  • feta
  • lemon juice
  • olive oil
  • salt
  • pepper

I made a similar version the other day with spinach instead of kale and added dried mint and dill for a little extra flavor.


Peanut rice bowl

IMG_3862I started packing lunches again recently, and the rice bowl has made a dramatic reappearance in my life. It’s simple, healthy, filling, and tastes good cold – all criteria I look for in my packed lunches. This one had:

  • brown rice
  • steamed kale
  • broccoli
  • garbanzo beans
  • roasted sweet potato
  • easy peanut sauce (peanut butter+soy sauce+rice wine vinegar+sriracha)



The easiest pizza

IMG_3864I’ve been making reiterations of pita bread pizzas since high school. They’re quick, cheap, and customizable.

A friend and I came up with this latest version on a road trip a couple months ago, and I’ve made it several times since. As usual lately, it’s not a really a recipe, but is worth trying.

Pita Bread Pizzas 


  • whole wheat pita bread
  • tomato paste
  • minced garlic
  • salt
  • pepper
  • chopped spinach
  • broccoli
  • cheese
  • egg


  1. Preheat oven to 400ºF
  2. Mix together tomato paste, minced garlic, salt, and pepper to make the sauce
  3. Top pita with sauce, spinach, broccoli, and cheese
  4. Make a small well in the middle and crack the egg on top
  5. Top with salt and pepper
  6. Bake until egg is cooked to your liking

Curry night

IMG_3835While admittedly not the same as our favorite Indian takeout, this recipe for channa masala is easy and tasty. I have a feeling the difference is partly due to the amount of butter involved and while I will always love the real deal, it’s nice to have a healthier option as well. We served it with brown rice and creamed spinach, in the spirit of palak paneer.

The spinach was a surprise hit, especially given how simple it was to make. I was a little intimidated by the thought of making a béchamel sauce, and was terrified that I was going to burn the roux, but thankfully, it ended up being far easier than I expected. The way the sauce thickens when you add milk is like a little bit of kitchen magic. I didn’t measure anything but I think it merits bare bones instructions, if not an actual recipe – I’m certainly planning on making this again.

  • Steam a bunch of spinach and roughly chop it
  • Make a roux (more on that here) and add cream, milk, nutmeg, salt, and pepper
  • Add spinach to sauce and heat to combine